Cabinet 62 Summer 2017

Milk

ISBN13/Barcode: 9781932698701
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Milk is a primal substance. Milk is the first fluid to enter our mouths, to touch the tongue, to fill the belly. Our first words form around it and it flows into our language: in our thoughts and actions, we skim, condense, homogenize, express....


So goes the lead article in this issue, see http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/62/jackson_leslie.php

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For a full table of contents, click here.

Quench your thirst for all things lactic with:

Melanie Jackson and Esther Leslie on the primal contradictions of milk
Will Wiles on Bournville, the town that Cadbury’s milk chocolate built
Sally O’Reilly on Silk Cashewmilk’s demoralizing disingenuousness
Jeff Dolven on the moral ambivalence of milk in Hitchcock’s Suspicion
Allen Ginsberg on the transmogrifying talents of Harry Smith
–And milk from Pauline Wayne, the last presidential cow

Then enjoy more of the crème de la crème with:
Alice Butler on Cookie Mueller’s life in stories
Eduardo Cadava and Xenia Vytuleva on musical X-ray records and Soviet dissidence
Reconciliation, an artist project by S. Billie Mandle, introduced by George Prochnik
Brian Dillon on a single sentence by Virginia Woolf
Annie Julia Wyman on Mountbatten Pink
Mats Bigert on the pleasures, and terrors, of the egg
D. Graham Burnett on the arachnid origins of telescopic crosshairs
Marta Figlerowicz on the temporalities of autocracy in Poland and the United States
–And the new installment of Kiosk, our quarterly notebook

Additional Information

Author N/A
Binding Magazine
Pages 112
Report Date N/A
Date Published 29 Jun 2017
Frequency No
ISBN13/Barcode 9781932698701
ISBN10 1932698701
Publisher Cabinet

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